About Partnership

We partner to continue a history in making a difference locally and overseas. 

 African church, Hunan province , China

African church, Hunan province , China

From the early days contributing to local Adelaide City Mission (now Mission Australia) and supporting global endeavours in Bolivia, Sri Lanka and Brazil, our commitment is to continue to go into all the world.  A summary of our partnership commitments are shown below.

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We have chosen to answer calling of the Word and proclaim the name of Jesus to all nations.  Having a heart and passion to go to the nations takes us to many places.  Our commitment is to send support, to pray and to remember those who go, but just as important is our willingness to go, serve and be in the nations. 

 Vellore, India

Vellore, India

 Taguig, Philippines

Taguig, Philippines

 Cebu, Philippines

Cebu, Philippines

 Suva, Fiji

Suva, Fiji

 Chitwan, Nepal

Chitwan, Nepal

 West Bengal, India

West Bengal, India

Purpose in partnership

Clarity of purpose can be conveyed through clear vision.  Clear vision should never be new of itself.  Rather, a clear vision reflects God’s given calling to another generation.  A clear vision should be obvious, connecting our past to a future that inspires and directs our present – all within our specific and unique calling of the Lord.  We are sent by Jesus to make a difference.  And making a difference in Christ means accomplishing more than we could dream, because He has gone before us.

"…anyone who believes in me will do the same works I have done, and even greater works...” John 14:12

Our partnerships therefore require faith, commitment and sacrifice.  We are clarified our hopes by stating our commitment to partnerships with a 5 year plan.  Our plan contains hope that encourages us to stretch in love, and to act with faithfulness to our calling.  Our partnerships call for open hands and prayerful hearts looking 5 years onward from 2018 until 2023.

But while we plan, we know that real life will challenge us, possibly requiring adjustments over time, so we trust the Lord for the right answers in all situations.

We can make our own plans, but the Lord gives the right answer. Pr 16:1
We can make our plans, but the Lord determines our steps. Pr 16:9
Commit your actions to the Lord, and your plans will succeed. Pr 16:3

Our plan is a practice of our vision.  We look to the Lord in order to take steps to follow Him in faith, now, and as the years unfold.  And we trust that these actions are committed to the Lord, and through His answers and taking His steps, we know that we shall succeed.

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Local Partners

Local Partnerships are groups, institutions and people we are committed to serving and supporting.  Local is our community, our city and our nation.  Our support is financial, participatory, and faithful in prayer.  Our hope is to let our light shine, and do whatever we can to make a difference.

Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven.    Mt 5:15-16

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This is to my Father’s glory, that you bear much fruit, showing yourselves to be my disciples. John 15:8


School Chaplaincy

Contributing to the support of local chaplains at Marden Senior, Glenunga and Marryatville High, and Burnside Primary School. Chaplains provide highly regarded pastoral care for students and families.

Prayer support and encouragement is essential and appreciated. Our partnership is with Burnside Inter-Church Council supporting Schools Ministry Group.

Rahab Ministries

Rahab Ministry outreaches to the sex workers across Adelaide and Australia, and has been going for 15 years.

Rahab is supported by our Church through giving, facility use and program support.

Evangelical Students

Our 2 year partnership with Warwick in Student Ministry is through Evangelical Students. 

Warwick commenced a 2 year ministry apprenticeship and works with university students in training and coaching.

There is an ongoing history of God moving through young adults and campus based ministry.

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Combined Christmas Endeavours

A key ministry of this partnership with Eastern Suburbs Churches is the annual involvement with the Norwood Christmas Pageant.

Our part also includes providing storage for equipment and props, and program support.

 
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Global Partners

For those who are called and sent out into the world, there are those who stay and serve the local Church.  But for those who stay, there is no less a burden to go into all the world.  While we have opportunities for short term ministry trips, our role is to partner,  to support, care, enable, encourage and pray for those who go. We call these our Global Partners.  We want to make the most of every chance to show our concern.   So join us in prayer, in support, in giving and making the most of our chances to help and make a difference.

How I praise the Lord that you are concerned about me again. I know you have always been concerned for me, but you didn’t have the chance to help me.  Philippians 4:10

 Childrens Home, Sri Lanka

Childrens Home, Sri Lanka

 Missionary training, brazil

Missionary training, brazil

Our two primary areas of Global Partnership are:

  1. missionaries serving in Brazil,
  2. contributing to a Children's Home in Sri Lanka.

WEC Brazil [Vicky & Tony]

Our partnership is with Vicky and Tony who work with WEC Brazil. A significant part of their ministry has been to train up missionaries and send them throughout South America and beyond.

Vicky was sent by Stepney Christian Church for missionary service, and continues to serve with husband Tony in Brazil.  When Stepney closed, Burnside became their home church here in Adelaide.

They have raised up a thriving church ministry, outreach into their community and unreached people groups, and minister in the missionary and bible colleges.

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Vicky & Tony [Resettlement]

At a date yet to be finalised, we want to be ready for Vicky and Tony to return to Adelaide.  Missionaries have no superannuation.  They go on mission, with or without support, but trust in the Lord to provide. 

In order to support their resettlement, we are putting aside funds to bless and enable the Alkmim’s to cover significant resettlement costs. This gift will be provided directly to them as local ministers of the gospel upon their return.


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Sri Lankan Children's Homes

Our partnership is with Sri Lankan Children’s Homes through Global Development Group.  We contribute to the support a girls’ home (21 girls) and a boys’ home (13 boys) directly, and through sponsorship.

The hope is for a self-sustaining venture through farming and education.  All children are displaced by the civil war and unrest, and referred to care by government departments. Children are educated within the community.

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Being Partners

The bible speaks about a freedom that challenges today’s Church – the freedom in giving. Fasting is a sacrifice of your need of food, and in part reminds us like food, how much we need God at work in our lives.  When was the last time you freely gave sacrificially?  Not from your surplus, but from an area you needed to give up or sacrifice?

All the believers were together and had everything in common.  They sold property and possessions to give to anyone who had need.  Acts 2:44-45

We are so blessed in Australia that our cultural thinking to giving tends to be within our means.  The bible doesn’t instruct you to be poor, but it does challenge you to have a generous heart ready to follow. 

Looking at the man, Jesus felt genuine love for him. “There is still one thing you haven’t done,” he told him. “Go and sell all your possessions and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven. Then come, follow me.”  Mark 10:17-31

It is easy to justify a misunderstanding of kingdom stewardship, but for followers of Jesus, sacrifice is connected to stewardship.  We ought to be able to freely give sacrificially as the need arises, trusting that our God will supply all our needs!  We the church are the ‘called out’ ones, a congregation of believers who are committed to doing life together and serving the Lord, having not only a strong emphasis of sacrifice, but a joy of sacrifice.  This comes from the freedom that exists when the Holy Spirit rules our lives.  When the Holy Spirit rules, we have a Kingdom or eternity mindset.  Anyone can give out of their abundance, but when the Holy Spirit rules, maturity in Christ means we are generous through sacrifice.  It is not about how much….but a commitment and trust to God first – shown through giving. 

‘…for they all out of their surplus put into the offering; but she out of her poverty put in all that she had to live on’  Luke 21:4

Share with us in a renewed calling to sacrificial giving in the area of missions, partnering together to make a difference both locally, and globally.  God will not forget your sacrificial giving – for treasures are laid up in heaven. (Mt 6:19-20)


I would like to be a partner

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Ongoing Mission Heritage

"The living, the living—they praise you, as I am doing today; parents tell their children about your faithfulness"  Is 38:19

These are some of the stories of missionary endeavour and partnerships that stand as our heritage as a Church.  The ongoing message and power of heritage serves to inspire us to continued faithfulness in going into all the world for the cause of Christ.

Hebrews 12:1 // Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a huge crowd of witnesses to the life of faith, let us strip off every weight that slows us down, especially the sin that so easily trips us up. And let us run with endurance the race God has set before us.

Scroll down to read the stories of heritage that inspire us to carry on:

  William & Helen Finlayson   William developed an interest in missionary service to the Pacific Islands. He tried unsuccessfully to join a Baptist Mission, but they refused because he wasn’t a Baptist, so he tried another mission, but they had no funds at the time to send anyone new. Then he saw the newspaper advertisement from the South Australia Company. William and his young wife Helen, sailed from Scotland, arriving in the very new colony in the heat of Feb 1837.

William & Helen Finlayson

William developed an interest in missionary service to the Pacific Islands. He tried unsuccessfully to join a Baptist Mission, but they refused because he wasn’t a Baptist, so he tried another mission, but they had no funds at the time to send anyone new. Then he saw the newspaper advertisement from the South Australia Company. William and his young wife Helen, sailed from Scotland, arriving in the very new colony in the heat of Feb 1837.

  Rockie & Irene Burrow // Bolivia - 1937    Rockie aged 23 and Irene arrived in Bolivia in 1937 and both studied Spanish in separate towns, because the Bolivian Indian Mission (later Andes Evangelical Mission), believed that ‘singles’ learn the language better than newly married.    They married in 1939 and went to live for 3 years in Colquechaca, a cold, dry mining town, 14,000 feet (4,267metres) above sea level.

Rockie & Irene Burrow // Bolivia - 1937

Rockie aged 23 and Irene arrived in Bolivia in 1937 and both studied Spanish in separate towns, because the Bolivian Indian Mission (later Andes Evangelical Mission), believed that ‘singles’ learn the language better than newly married.

They married in 1939 and went to live for 3 years in Colquechaca, a cold, dry mining town, 14,000 feet (4,267metres) above sea level.

  Reg & Hettie Burrow // Bolivia - 1911    Pastor Robert Finlayson and the Burnside folk farewelled, supported and prayed for their first missionaries, Reginald and Annetta Burrow, who worked from 1911 to 1927 with the Bolivian Indian Mission, (later renamed the Andes Evangelical Mission, which eventually amalgamated with SIM).

Reg & Hettie Burrow // Bolivia - 1911

Pastor Robert Finlayson and the Burnside folk farewelled, supported and prayed for their first missionaries, Reginald and Annetta Burrow, who worked from 1911 to 1927 with the Bolivian Indian Mission, (later renamed the Andes Evangelical Mission, which eventually amalgamated with SIM).

 Lincoln & Win Burrow // Bolivia - 1939  Lincoln and Win Burrow served in Bolivia from 1939 to 1968 with The Bolivian Indian Mission, renamed the Andes Evangelical Mission in 1965 and now taken over by SIM.

Lincoln & Win Burrow // Bolivia - 1939

Lincoln and Win Burrow served in Bolivia from 1939 to 1968 with The Bolivian Indian Mission, renamed the Andes Evangelical Mission in 1965 and now taken over by SIM.

  Ron & Lina Trudinger // Sudan in 1913   After meeting Dr Karl Thumm, founder of the Sudan United Mission, Ron went to the Sudan in 1913 to the town of Melut in South Sudan, 400 miles south of Khartoum on the Upper River Nile near the border with Northern Sudan and began to build a mission station.

Ron & Lina Trudinger // Sudan in 1913

After meeting Dr Karl Thumm, founder of the Sudan United Mission, Ron went to the Sudan in 1913 to the town of Melut in South Sudan, 400 miles south of Khartoum on the Upper River Nile near the border with Northern Sudan and began to build a mission station.

 Dorothy & Arnold Long  //  Australian Missionary Society - 1930-90s  Dorothy and Arnold Long established the Australian Missionary Society and worked in the Northern Territory and Queensland from the 1930s to the 1990’s.

Dorothy & Arnold Long // Australian Missionary Society - 1930-90s

Dorothy and Arnold Long established the Australian Missionary Society and worked in the Northern Territory and Queensland from the 1930s to the 1990’s.

 
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William & Helen Finlayson

The current Burnside Family Church, which began in 1864 as the Burnside Christian Chapel, has a long history of missionary involvement, going back to the first pastor, William Finlayson. He grew up in Scotland and became a Christian as young man who loved romantic novels, but one day by mistake grabbed a Bible and found God speaking to him as he read through the book of Isaiah.

After several years attending Bible Study groups and participating in open air witnessing, William developed an interest in missionary service to the Pacific Islands. He tried unsuccessfully to join a Baptist Mission, but they refused because he wasn’t a Baptist, so he tried another mission, but they had no funds at the time to send anyone new.

Then he saw the newspaper advertisement from the South Australia Company asking for married couples to come as settlers to the new colony of SA.

William and his young wife Helen, sailed from Scotland, arriving in the very new colony in the heat of Feb 1837, when the surveying of the city of Adelaide wasn’t completed and life was difficult and primitive.

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Although still hoping to be a missionary to the Pacific Islanders, or to the Aboriginal people around Adelaide, William found himself instead involved in the early development of Scots Church, then Tom Playford’s Bentham St Chapel in the late 1840s, the Zion Chapel in Pulteney St in 1855 and finally the church here at Burnside in 1864. (see photo)

William and Helen’s 9 children were brought up attending Sunday School at Mitcham Christian Chapel (which became Mitcham Baptist) and when they were older, attended Zion Chapel.  Some of the children and grandchildren were actively interested in supporting missionary outreach.

The Zion Chapel sent out missionaries to China, Sudan and India, including William Finlayson’s granddaughters, Dr Ethel Ambrose and her older sister Nurse

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Lily Ambrose, who both served with the Poona and Indian Village Mission for decades from 1905. Dr Ethel (on the left in the photo) with a lovely, industrious manner, was greatly respected during her training and work experience in Australia, at a time when women doctors had a hard time. Then in India her selfless, caring efforts in developing medical care for women and children, made her much loved by staff and patients, first at Nasrapur and later for many years at Pandharpur.

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Their uncle Robert Finlayson co pastored at Zion Chapel and Burnside with his father from 1864 until 1874, when he became pastor in his own right at Burnside until his death in 1916. During this time the Burnside congregation grew through sound teaching and developed an interest in the China Inland Mission and other missions seeking workers for Africa, India, Asia, the Pacific Islands and South America.

A Missionary Training College was set up in Adelaide at Hope Lodge, Belair, which later moved to North Adelaide and was known as Angus College, because of the interest of the family of George Fife Angus, an early SA pioneer. Then a Women’s Missionary Training College was set up at Seaton House in Kensington Park.

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In 1899 the large extension was built onto the front of the original smaller chapel and it was there in 1911 that Pastor Robert Finlayson and the Burnside folk supported and prayed for their first missionaries to Bolivia, both graduates of the Missionary Training Colleges.

Since then many long and short term missionaries have gone from Burnside to overseas countries, as well as here within Australia, supported and prayed for by the Church members. Over the years the various Church Ladies Groups sewed and knitted and fundraised for missions and for decades the monthly Ladies Missionary Prayer Meeting supported the church missionaries and had informative visits from many other missionaries on furlough.

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Reg & Hettie Burrow

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Pastor Robert Finlayson and the Burnside folk farewelled, supported and prayed for their first missionaries, Reginald and Annetta Burrow, who worked from 1911 to 1927 with the Bolivian Indian Mission, (later renamed the Andes Evangelical Mission, which eventually amalgamated with SIM).

Reg was born in England, grew up in NZ, and was an avid reader with an excellent memory, who learnt watch making and marine engineering. After becoming a Christian in his early 20s, he learnt of the newly established Bolivian Indian Mission and began to gain knowledge of medicines from a local pharmacy, helped with local medical work, then travelled to S.A. to study at a Missionary Bible Training College in Adelaide. He met Annetta Slape, also a Missionary Bible College graduate from Burnside Church and they married in 1910.

It took more than 3 months to travel from Australia to Bolivia, on cargo ships, which often went around Cape Horn to Montevideo in Uruguay. Then they had to travel for days on horseback to Bolivia.  Contact by sea mail was slow and there was little financial support from the mission.

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Reg became fluent in Spanish and was effectively involved in medical work, outdoor evangelism, baptism, (see photo) Bible teaching and church planting among the Quechua people. Reg’s medical knowledge and engineering skills, helped in his appointment in Bolivia as a District Medical Officer around San Pedro where they lived and enabled him to persuade the local Government to let him help them to replace the unhealthy open water canal through the centre of the town streets. Water pipes were installed with several public taps.

Bolivia had only been opened to Protestant Missions in 1900 and there was fierce opposition from the Roman Catholic Church. Priests collected and burnt Bibles and Reg, who gave out tracts and Bibles in Spanish, received death threats.

Hettie supported Reg in his ministry, which at times meant he was away for weeks, travelling on horseback to give medical help in outlying regions. She extended hospitality and support to new missionaries and cared for their family in primitive conditions, without electricity or running water. Their three older boys, all born in Bolivia, were taught by a local missionary, but the eldest eventually had to go away to boarding school for secondary schooling.

Photo is from first furlough back to S.A. in the early 1920s.

  Photo L.to R. Annetta, (Hettie), Victor, Allan, Reinaldo (Rockie), Reginald.     
  
   
   
  
    
  
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Photo L.to R. Annetta, (Hettie), Victor, Allan, Reinaldo (Rockie), Reginald.

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There were less than 20 Christians in Bolivia when Reg and Hettie arrived in 1911, but by the 1960s there was great growth and dozens of churches had been established. Photo shows a small part of a very large Sunday School in San Pedro in the early 1920s.

After 15 years of faithful ministry, the family returned to Adelaide for the boys’ secondary education. A fourth son John, was born and Reg became pastor at Burnside for nearly 20 years (1929 to 1948). He encouraged the growing congregation to plan and save from 1932, for the eventual building of the new current church, opened and dedicated in August 1939.

Reg. encouraged missionary interest at Burnside and had the joy of commissioning his son Rockie in 1937 and nephew Lincoln Burrow in 1939, for what became 29 years each of missionary service in Bolivia with their families.

Later their eldest son Allan, was the first principal of Adelaide Bible Institute, now the Bible College of SA, which has trained many missionaries.

Reg battled health problems over several decades, but even in retirement he continued to preach and encourage and was always known for wearing a distinctive bow tie, even in Bolivia. He died in 1975 aged 93 and Hettie died in 1983. (Photo 1958)

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 A small brass plaque inscribed with Reg’s name in memory of his many years of faithful service in Bolivia and Burnside, is on one of the special church armchairs, used to seat the Elders and Deacons participating in Communion services in the new 1939 church.

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Ron & Lina Trudinger

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Dr Ron Trudinger, who spent 40 years in south Sudan from 1913 to 1953, was probably sent out from St Giles Presbyterian Church at Norwood and came to Burnside many years later. He was the 13th child born to godly missionary parents in 1886 at Norwood and knew Christ as his Lord and Saviour from a young age. After finishing his medical training in 1909, he was House Surgeon for several years at the old RAH and was enthused by the visit to Adelaide of Dr Karl Thumm, founder of the Sudan United Mission. When Ron went to the Sudan in 1913 with his older brother Martin and 2 men from N.Z., he was a keen, well qualified 27 year old, with experience in surgery and tropical medicine. The small pioneering group of men, went to the town of Melut in South Sudan, 400 miles south of Khartoum on the Upper River Nile near the border with Northern Sudan and began to build a mission station.

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Ron lived very simply, was a gifted linguist and a keen travelling evangelist, sometimes trekking for days across the flat grassy plains among the Dinka people, learning their Padang dialect, folklore and customs. He was valued for his excellent skills in medical diagnosis, untiring in his work and love for the people and by 1918 a hospital and church had been built at Melut, where they could enjoy worship, singing and listening to Bible stories in their own Dinka Padang dialect. By 1926 Ron had translated the N.T. book of Luke and other missionaries did similar translation work in their areas, which was then printed by the British & Foreign Bible Society. He also completed a Dinka Grammar and Dinka/English Dictionary. The neighbouring Shilluck tribes came for medical treatment, so Ron learnt their language too and was able to preach the Gospel, which brought many to faith.

When Ron returned to Adelaide in 1917 for his first furlough, he married his fiancé, Lina Hoopmann, daughter of a Lutheran pastor from Yorketown. She had also come to faith at an early age, had trained as a music teacher, as well as completing general nursing and midwifery training. Her skills proved invaluable as she supported Ron in his medical work, worked in the dispensary, taught in the mission school and cared for their 4 children, 3 of whom were born in Africa. When the Sudan United Mission wanted to concentrate on the Nubians and transferred their work on the Nile to other missions, Ron joined the American Presbyterian Mission and continued with the Dinka Padang people, completing the translation of the books of Acts and John by 1943. For 4 years during the Depression and 3 years after WW2, Ron worked alone while his devoted wife Lina returned to Adelaide for the education of their 4 children. When she returned to Sudan, the two youngest boys boarded with a Burnside church family next door in Nilpinna St and one son became the Burnside Church Youth Leader. Later their daughter and her husband were missionaries in India, while two of the sons worked among Aboriginal people at Ernabella and Hermannsburg.                                

After 40 years of pioneering service in rugged, primitive conditions, Ron and Lina retired and returned to Adelaide in 1953, the year after the British and Foreign Bible Society published Ron’s completed Dinka New Testament, which has been a lasting and living memorial to the 33 years of painstaking translation and checking.

During his years of retirement, Ron became an Elder here at Burnside and was the only Elder at the time of the church Incorporation in 1962. He also worked among alcoholics at the Glenside Hospital and shared the Gospel with immigrants, resulting in many finding faith in Jesus. Even when over 80, Ron learnt Italian, in order to communicate with an Italian migrant family in his street.  

Lina died in March 1967 aged 87, surrounded by the family. Then in Ron’s last months, even with failing health, he worked in Alice Springs at the Christian Bookstore, set up by Dorothy and Arnold Long of the Australian Missionary Society. He was greatly loved by the Aboriginal people as a result of this valuable time in Alice Springs.

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Ron died in December 1968 aged 82 and one of our old Communion service armchairs is inscribed in his memory and to the glory of God. This much loved, very gracious man of prayer was described at his special Memorial service as humble, unassuming and unfailingly kind. Pastor Reg Burrow preached, the Burnside choir sang and two African women came to share their testimony tribute at a time of great political turmoil in Sudan, between north and south. Decades later, in 2011 Daniel Yhor, of Sudanese background, visited Australia with SIM and wanted to find Dr Ron’s church. He received photos of the church and a copy of Ron’s Memorial service, to show to Dinka people who still remember and honour Dr Ron Trudinger’s Medical and Translation ministry and have named their Mission Centre after him.                

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Rockie & Irene Burrow

Reg and Hettie Burrow’s second son Reinaldo born in Bolivia in 1914, was known as Rockie, because a Bolivian playmate called him Wokey (my brother). He learnt much of missionary life growing up in Bolivia, but his primary schooling was inconsistent, so that when the family returned to SA, Rockie aged 11 or 12, struggled with his year 7 studies at Burnside Primary School and left Norwood High School after year 10, because in those days fees were required. He was part of local and church life and felt called to return to the land of his birth to share his faith.

At age 19, Rockie went to study and train at the Sydney Missionary Bible College for 2 years and utilised his carpentry skills to help with building work. His future wife Irene Stephens, who trained there for 1 year, was involved with Rockie’s cousin Winnie in the Christian Endeavour movement, which was strongly supported at Burnside.

On completion of their studies, Irene did some training at McBride Maternity Hospital, while Rockie cycled to Hilton and Underdale Baptist churches to enable him to complete a year of interim pastoral work and preaching, as well as acquiring basic medical knowledge at the RAH Casualty Dept. watching doctors bandaging, suturing and other skills used often in Bolivia, until more professional medical help was available.

Rockie aged 23 and Irene arrived in Bolivia in 1937 and both studied Spanish in separate towns, because the Bolivian Indian Mission (later Andes Evangelical Mission), believed that ‘singles’ learn the language better than newly married. Rockie's childhood in Bolivia and knowledge of both Quechua and Spanish gave him an initial advantage, but Irene’s musical ear allowed her to learn both languages with less effort.

They married in 1939 and went to live for 3 years in Colquechaca, a cold, dry mining town, 14,000 feet (4,267metres) above sea level in the towering Andes Mountains, with no running water and intermittent electricity. The town was a centre for Quechua evangelism, but Irene’s poor health eventually resulted in a move to lower altitude and in their new location they set up a school for Quechua children. They taught the children in Spanish, the official language of Bolivia, but also found themselves learning and becoming proficient in Quechua. By then Rockie had developed creative stick figures as an effective way to illustrate his stories and teaching.

During the war years of the 1940s, it wasn't possible for church folk to send support money to Bolivia, so Rockie and Irene let Quechua people stay in a room of their house on their way to and from the local market in return for food and other helpful items. Rockie said that throughout this period they never lacked food - God always provided in some way or other.

Travel was often on horseback, or mule over rough, dangerous, high tracks and at times Rockie rode a bike when appropriate. In more suitable areas, trucks were used on rough dirt and cobbled roads.

The women wore all their skirts and petticoats in layers altogether and lice were often unwelcome companions after Quechuas stayed at their house, or when they visited Quechua houses and also when holding a person’s head while Rockie pulled teeth.

 
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Rockie and Irene spent the whole of 1944 in Cochabamba while waiting for a ship to bring them back to Australia for their first furlough. Good use was made of the time by staying in different villages for about a month, holding open air meetings, as well as planting a church.

There is a Quechua saying that, "what is written endures," so in 1947, after returning from their first furlough, Rockie and Irene developed a serious literacy evangelism program. Rockie drew pictures to go with the sounds in a basic primer, which he posted to his father Reg Burrow, who had it printed at the Adelaide Advertiser and posted back to Bolivia.

The Quechua people, who worked for Spanish landlords, were so keen to learn to read, that they bought Scriptures in Spanish to assist their reading skills, although at one time, some mistakenly thought they were buying title to the land.

The program of evangelism through teaching people to read, empowered them with life skills and continued for two years until the Quecha Bible Institute at Quillacollo near Cochabamba, needed a principal. Teaching O.T. subjects there, was their main ministry for the remainder of their time in Bolivia. During term breaks, Rockie promoted Bible Conferences for the Quechua people, with an emphasis on faith and discipleship, all of which was greatly valued at the time, as well as in the years after they had left Bolivia.

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Irene was a very gifted singer and musician and played several instruments, including the piano accordion. She had a very valuable ministry with the Quechuas, who loved to sing and make music. She conducted a ladies choir, wrote hymns to their tunes and organised sewing and knitting groups, as well as ladies Bible studies.  

 

 

During Rockie and Irene Burrow’s second term in Bolivia, Alison was born in 1949 and Robert in 1951, but by 1952, 3-year old Alison had contracted polio. They returned to Adelaide for treatment and during the 6-week boat trip, Alison’s paralysed legs responded to Rockie’s massage. Extended leave aided her recovery, including some time at Minlaton, where Rockie pastored the local Baptist Church, with a donated cow to supply milk.

The family returned to Bolivia in 1955 with enough clothes to last for the next 6 years, plus a knitting machine so that Quechua women could knit llama wool jumpers for export to give them an income. Rockie developed other suitable crafts and industries to assist the Quechua people to help themselves financially. He continued lecturing in the Quillacollo Quechua Bible Institute, not far from Cochabamba, where he also oversaw the building of a church, which is still in use to this day and was visited a few years ago by his nephew Paul Burrow, who had also grown up in Bolivia.

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During the next furlough in 1961, the family photo was used on the cover of a vinyl record of Irene’s beautiful rendition of nine Gospel songs and hymns. It was recorded here at Burnside, by some Technicians from Radio 5AD (the Advertiser Broadcasting Network), with the church organist and pianist.

Rockie, Irene and Robert returned to Bolivia without Alison, who needed to complete her secondary schooling, so she stayed with Rockie’s older brother Allan, (by then the Principal of NZ Bible College).

Rockie continued his lecturing, supported by Irene, but during this time Irene was treated for cancer and had to go to USA for radiation treatment in 1964.

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Then sadly, after close to 30 years of missionary service and Bible teaching, from 1937 to 1966, they returned to Adelaide because of Irene’s ongoing poor health.

Rockie was pastor here at Burnside from 1967 to 1973 and he and Irene lived in the manse across the road in Nilpinna St.

As well as preaching, Rockie taught 4 Religious Instruction classes at Burnside, Marryatville and Linden Park Primary Schools. Like his father Pastor Reg., Rockie was able to produce very creative visual aids to illustrate children’s talks at church and for RI, using cardboard, or wood, with movable parts and simple texta labels. Children were intrigued to discover how the teaching aid could relate a Christian message.

In spite of ongoing health issues, Irene faithfully supported Rockie in his pastorate at Burnside, in home visiting, involvement at ladies meetings and sang soprano in the choir.

In 1973 they moved to a position lecturing in Old Testament studies at Tahlee Bible College, NSW, which prepared many young adults for missionary service. Irene died there in 1975, having continued to acknowledge her trust in God for her future as her health deteriorated. 

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Rockie continued lecturing at Tahlee and a few years later married his cousin Winnie Burrow, after her return from 26 years of missionary service in Borneo.

They retired from Tahlee in 1982 and returned to Burnside, where Rockie served as an Elder until 1998 with many opportunities to preach.

They were both actively involved in Kids Club, which had begun in the mid 1980s and helped with stories, craft and counselling, as long as they were able. Rockie used simple drawings and aids backed with foam, for use on a flannel graph board for Kids’ Club talks.

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There were also many years of faithful preaching and teaching at Auldana Home at Magill, Holden Hill Christian Fellowship and a Spanish speaking group, where Rockie carefully planned and presented stories using Overhead projector sheets. He utilised the special stick figures, which he called Little Jets, developed decades earlier when teaching children in Bolivia, e.g. this is one page of 9 for the story of Ruth and Boaz in Spanish.

Together Rockie and Winnie continued their prayerful and practical support of various missions, especially Christian radio FEBC and SIM (which had amalgamated with the Andes Evangelical Mission, formerly Bolivian Indian Mission). 

Eventually Winnie’s health and memory began to fail and she died in 2002. 

When Rockie’s health deteriorated in 2013, he moved to Residential Care, where his missionary outreach continued as he witnessed to staff and residents.

Many of the congregation will remember that Rockie, although deaf and almost totally blind, memorised his special, final, public sermon for the church’s 150th Anniversary in November 2014, a few days after he reached the age of 100.

Rockie continued his fervent interest and regular prayer support of friends, church folk, missionaries and missions, until finally the 101 year old missionary and prayer warrior left this life on September 24th, 2016, for that longed for better one.

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Lincoln & Win Burrow

Lincoln and Win Burrow served in Bolivia from 1939 to 1968 with The Bolivian Indian Mission, renamed the Andes Evangelical Mission in 1965 and now taken over by SIM.

Lincoln Burrow grew up in Greenhill Rd, Burnside. His mother Agnes Slape was married to Cecil Burrow, brother of Reg Burrow, which made him Rockie’s cousin. Lincoln was a singer and musician, who trained as a teacher and taught for 2 years on Eyre Peninsula, before going to Sydney Missionary Bible College and then on to Bolivia aged about 25 in 1939.

Lincoln taught in the Mission School for a couple of years and then met Walter Herron, a missionary pilot, who was described in his biography as Condor of the Jungle. Lincoln used his mechanical and innovative skills to help Wally develop the Missionary Aviation program for the Bolivian Mission, in the lowlands of the Beni district in the north of Bolivia (see blue map area).

Prior to that, only 2 other missions elsewhere in the world had begun to use a plane to get to distant places.

In 1941 Lincoln and Wally worked for a month to assemble the small new Piper Cub plane, shipped from USA in a gigantic crate, then by train to Cochabamba.                                                                   

Successful flight tests, were followed by an amazing journey to fly it out over the high mountains and down to the Beni lowlands.  After frustrating, daunting events, God worked miracles to get them a much needed, valuable supply of fuel and vital finance, from a grateful Bolivian Senator.

Wally and Lincoln visited towns in the Beni lowlands where Lincoln attracted a crowd by playing his concertina, while Wally preached the Gospel and sold Bibles.

They discovered isolated people with leprosy, shared the Gospel and brought them much needed medical supplies.

After 3 or 4 years of invaluable mechanical help with this first BIM plane, Lincoln felt a call to the Quechua people in the highlands, so he studied the language with his cousin Rockie and Irene at their little school in Cochabamba and this began a very strong bond between the cousins.

Being in Bolivia during the 1940’s war, Lincoln was able to make ends meet by repairing and cleaning watches, a skill learnt from his father.

With the war over he returned to Australia for his first furlough and married Win from Tumby Bay, Eyre Peninsula in 1946.  They went to Bolivia early in the next year and while Win learnt Spanish, Lincoln continued to study Quechua and ministered in San Pedro, (the original HQ of the mission, where his Uncle Reg and Aunt Hettie had served in the 1920s).

During this time two sons were born, Paul in 1947 and John in 1949. Lincoln also taught in and helped build the expanding Missionary Children’s School, located over the road from the Quechua Bible Institute and after a year’s furlough in 1952 they returned to Bolivia where Lincoln again taught in the same School in Cochabamba (now known as the Carachipampa Christian School with over 200 students from Missionary and Bolivian families). Their calling continued to be to the Quechua people, so they began an itinerant ministry to the small groups of Christians scattered around the city of Potosi, the tin mining ‘capital’ of South America. Finally they settled in the market town of Betanzos, partway between Sucre and Potosi, where Lincoln built a house and church complex and a strong and independent church and outreach ministry developed.  Betanzos became the centre of about 50 smaller house churches. During this term, Jim was born in 1956.

 Back: Paul (eldest), John and Jim. Front: Lincoln, David and Win    
  
   
   
  
    
  
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Back: Paul (eldest), John and Jim. Front: Lincoln, David and Win

Their next furlough was extended, due to the surprise arrival of David (1961),

Lincoln, Win and the two youngest boys returned to Betanzos, but Paul and John needed to complete their secondary schooling, so they remained in Adelaide with their grandmother Agnes Burrow, widow of Cecil, (who had died in 1941, a few years after an amazing effort supervising the building of the new red brick church in 1939 and sanding the floor).

Lincoln and Win were good singers and musicians, so a key part of their open air evangelism was singing, accompanied by concertina. Lincoln prepared many music masters for the first Quecha hymn book, a laborious, manual process, working with Irene, wife of cousin Rockie and one other, resulting in many well-known hymns being translated and some of these were set to traditional Quechua tunes.

Eventually Jim also returned to Adelaide for his schooling, while Lincoln, Win and young David continued their main ministry building up the local church. A significant amount of time was spent on the road in a campervan, with David. This enabled them to minister for extended periods without imposing on the very poor villagers.  During this time Lincoln suffered from a duodenal ulcer requiring surgery and a lengthy period of recuperation.

After nearly 30 years’ service from 1939 to 1968, they returned to Win’s hometown of Tumby Bay, where Lincoln taught in the local school. On retirement they bought an old campervan and toured Australia visiting friends and relatives.

Eldest son Paul and wife Linda moved to Tumby Bay many years ago to keep a caring eye on Lincoln, who died in 2005, aged 91 and Win, who died a few years later. Youngest son David died a few years ago after battling cancer in his jaw, but never lost his faith.

Paul and Linda, who have been involved in church activities and Beach Missions, spent a few months in Bolivia several years ago and visited the church built by Lincoln back in the 1950s

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Dorothy & Arnold Long

Dorothy and Arnold Long established the Australian Missionary Society and worked in the Northern Territory and Queensland from the 1930s to the 1990’s. Like Ron and Lina Trudinger in Sudan, they weren’t sent out from Burnside, but came to us much later.

Arnold Long, born in Singleton NSW in 1909 to a missionary family, became a Christian at age 5. As a teenager he was involved in Christian Endeavour and Open Air Campaigners and was only 19 when his father died. He travelled extensively in a van dedicated to his father and pioneered work in the Northern Territory, where there was no established evangelical work among the Aboriginal people in the town centres.

Arnold married Dorothy Sales in 1938 and then, with another couple, they set up the first Aboriginal Bible College at Singleton later that same year.

They also helped to establish a church at Katherine in 1939, built from bush timber, scrap iron and kerosene tins. It became a living, functioning church and the Aboriginal Christians walked long distances to spread the Gospel to their own people. When Dorothy visited the church in Katherine in 1981, she received a warm, loving welcome from the older folk who remembered her.

For decades the Longs worked tirelessly among Aboriginal people in N.T. - Darwin, Katherine, Tennant Creek, Yuendumu (where they started the Baptist Mission in 1949), Pine Creek, Alice Springs in 1951 and Qld - Dajarra, Camooweal and Mount Isa. They helped to improve conditions for Aboriginal people and had an enormous spiritual impact by their caring witness to both

Aboriginal and white Australians, in outback Qld and N.T. They saw God work miracles, lives were changed and additional workers joined their mission.

Their first introduction to a family of their own, was when ladies from a nearby Aboriginal camp brought a baby boy a few days old to Dorothy. His mother had died, he was near death with no one to look after him, so they took him in and named him Joseph. As an adult he worked on cattle stations and remained part of the family until he died in 1997.

  Back row: Freda, Leonard, Dorothy Jr.  Front: Mrs Long, Arnold Jr, Mr Long.

Back row: Freda, Leonard, Dorothy Jr. Front: Mrs Long, Arnold Jr, Mr Long.

The Longs had 5 children of their own, Leonard 1945, Freda 1950, Dorothy 1951, Arnold 1953 and Paul 1956, (but he died later that year).

Mrs Long came from Alice Springs to Adelaide in the early 1960’s, for the secondary education of their children. She became a member here at Burnside and for several years ran the Intermediate Christian Endeavour group, while Mr Long continued to work among Aboriginal people in and around Alice Springs.

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The Longs established a Christian Bookstore in Alice Springs and distributed tracts and booklets, many written by Mr Long. His very popular Bushman’s Guide (now an eBook) has for decades helped to reach thousands with the message of the Gospel. This Christian Bookshop was where Dr Ron Trudinger (former missionary for 40 years in south Sudan), made such an impression living and working there in 1968 near the end of his life aged 82.

Dorothy returned to Alice Springs in 1968 to run the Children’s home, which they had established to help prevent more children becoming part of the “Stolen Generation”. Over 120 children spent varying time in the home, until a change of government policy allowed it to close in 1972.

Arnold and Dorothy lived very simply and over many years continued their involvement in evangelism, establishing and building up churches over a wide area, including the Kramer Memorial Church, opened in Alice Springs in 1977. Volunteers struggled for 7 years to complete this church, until God’s miraculous provision through Arnold’s seemingly chance meeting with a businessman, who organised materials and volunteers to finish the church. This ministry developed into Mobile Mission Maintenance, which helped build part of the new hall here at Burnside in 2000.

Arnold died in 1979 aged 70, while Dorothy continued with Aboriginal ministry until health problems in the 1990’s. She retired near some of her children in Queensland, where she died in 1997.

Some Australian Missionary Society workers continued working in Qld at Dajarra and Camooweal, but much of their N.T. work was taken over by AIM (Australian Indigenous Ministries).

In Southern NSW in 1983, young Arnold Jr was introduced to aboriginal youths, who wept, saying how much they had heard of his father, Arnold Long Sr and honoured him greatly, yet neither they, nor their parents had ever known him, instead in the early 1930s Mr Long had worked with their Grandparents.

Then in WA, where Mr Long had never been, Aboriginal people called his son “Mr Long” out of respect for his father.

During a court case, involving some members of the stolen generation in NT in 1999, lawyers on both sides of the case told the Longs’ children that, “the only people who acted with integrity, decency, consistency and compassion were your parents.” Their faithfulness and honesty were evident and acknowledged even 50 years after some of the events occurred.

Arnold and Dorothy Long served God in difficult and arduous circumstances, past retiring age and in spite of health problems. They were both much loved by Aboriginal people as a couple who truly lived lives honourable to God.

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